Tanzanian Adventures|The Maasai Women & Community

Update: 12/2017

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Going to the Tinga to visit the Maasai children was not all about playing with the children and feeding them, it was about getting to know the Maasai tribe. A part of the children’s feeding program is women’s empowerment program. Just like the program on the streets of Arusha, this program is to empower the Maasai women in their community. The women in our team sat down with a few of Maasai women who are a part of the program to discuss their culture, customs, what they need in order to provide for their children and community. Surprising all the questions asked and answered pointed to how each of us women is interconnected with wanting the same things in life. All women no matter the culture want the same things in life, and those some things are what connects us as women in this world. We asked so many questions of them and they asked a lot of question of us as well. Here is what I gathered from the discussion;

  • Maasai women marry at a very young age 15-16 years old
  • First child come roughly after marriage
  • Marriage is seen for bring children into the world and raising them.
  • Maasai women are surprised by how Western society marriage is more for companionship, love and not all about having children
  • Children help support the parents when they get old
  • Women in Western world marry later in life and produce children much later as well.
  • Women are more educated in Western society then they are in Maasai tribe. Maasai women are encourage now to finish primary school.
  • Maasai women want to see their children successful.
  • Convoy of Hope as helped them find ways to help feed their family and they are grateful for all Convoy of Hope has done for their community.
  • They considered us women like daughters to them. Daughters who are empowered to do great things in our own tribe.

I love their humor and their warmth towards outsiders who take an interest in who they are. I found their humor about western society’s concept of contraception methods to be hilarious (especially pull out method) and cause a roar of laughter from them. As a gift for participating in the discussion, we gave them each 2kg of nutritional rice to take home to their families.

We also have the opportunity in seeing their village and going inside their huts. It was a cool experience in seeing how they live, which is primitive, but cozy feel. I wish our team has the chance to spend the night with them, but this time of year with the rain would make it difficult to do. The tribe is very welcoming, not like the other Maasai in the area that like handouts first before being hospitable. The only downside to being at the Maasai village was the flies that were everywhere! The amount of flies became almost unbearable when we all decided to a prayer circle with them. At one point it became difficult to concentrate on the prayer when the flies where crawling all over my face and in my eyes. I really don’t know how Maasai tolerates having flies crawling all over them.

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Maasai village

 

The road that leads to the school and village in some parts had crushed African pink quartz with some specks of Tanzanite (yes the gem stone) and rubies mixed with the red clay. I was told there are mines further down the road which mines the quarts, the precious gemstone Tanzianite and other gemstones. I did not get a picture of this unfortunately, just imagine walking along and seeing the ground with specks of red, blues, and semi blue-brown lumps in pinkish-red sand. These natural resources give huge profits to multinational gemstone enterprises, but most of the people of this region and Tanzanian people do not see any of it flowing into their communities or country. Some of the Maasai men have been recruited into working in these mines with little to no income generated from their work. To pick these gems off the ground would lead to being confiscated at the border or worse jailed.

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Clean water is a vital resource we all need in order to live. In Africa clean water is hard to come by for the Maasai people. The school through Convoy of Hope was able to secure $22,000 in funding for a well that pumps clean water to the surface. In Tanzania the real problem is most of the water is not exactly safe to drink even in the cities, and out in the bush water reservoirs are polluted by the wild life using the water as well. Taking a shower at the hotel results in brown tinted water coming out of the pipes and everywhere I went there was massive amounts of brown muddy water. Bottle water was always given to me on this trip, and there were a few times some of the children wanted to take a drink of water out of my bottle. The well Convoy of Hope built has a pump that pumps fresh clean water to the surface for children to drink and carry home to their families. Once the well was put in the school there was  fewer children sick and those who benefit look a lot more healthy.

 

Also the school grows its own garden to teach the children agricultural practices. In the small green house there was Chinese cabbage, and a few other greens. Upon further inspection there was a lot of plants with something eating at their leaves. It looked like a tiny moth was flying around the greenhouse was possibly causing the plants to die from disease. It could also be locusts that are finding a way into the greenhouse and eating the plants. I saw a whole bunch outside in the bushes when viewing the water pump. Sadly the old enemy of all crops strikes and caused damage. I hate grasshoppers and locusts with vengeance!

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On the way back to civilization of Arusha, we were all treated to a sighting of a giraffe. My joke for the following picture is “run away from life’s problems like a giraffe.” It is amazing how graceful these large animals are! It close to a run like a horse with a very long neck!

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Meeting the Maasai is and will always be a highlight of my trip to Tanzania. I found the whole day full of surprises and full of laughs. A moment of time I will surely hold onto until I return again in the future.

***Bonus story***
Learning To Squat Like A Pro:
TMI alert ahead! You are warned!
Let’s talk about squat toilets. I mean not the ones you think when going in the woods. I mean the ones you see in Africa and not Asia. My real first encounter with a true African squat toilet was at the Tinga primary school. A hole in a concrete floor with a water bucket nearby without toilet paper. Think what the water bucket was for, now you know why there was no toilet paper. I have a hard time as is in peeing in the woods, let alone trying to squat over a public toilet in the States. So imagine me “squatting” over a hole in the middle of Africa. An adventure in itself. So here I was confronted with a hole in a concrete slab, with foot markers to help keep my feet from slipping, and wondering what the hell did I get myself into. So here I was squatting over the hole with both hand resting on the walls keeping me balanced (yuck I know), with my head  between my legs looking down the hole and hoping I don’t pee on my pant legs or shoes. Lucky I figured out how to squat which meant putting my butt at an angle, aim my vagina towards the hole, and make sure to keep the pee stream from missing the hole. It was torture when I realized how full my bladder was from drinking all that damn water, and realizing no matter how much I squat in the gym, it did no prepare me for this type of squatting. In the end I did not pee on myself in the process (Yay!) and someone had the sense to bring toilet paper for all of us to use (no nasty bucket water!). Good thing is the squat toilet does not even smell awful as a Honey Bucket or God awful boy toilets. I hear the Maasai women just go where ever even while standing and talking with someone! Just creates a puddle around their feet.

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Drop it like a squat!

Previous Post: Love From The Maasai Children & Feeding Program
Next Post: Wooden Desks

Disclaimer: All links are for reference and are in no way affiliate links. I do not receive or am paid for promotion on products mentioned in this post.

Tanzanian Adventure|Love From The Maasai Children & Feeding Program

 

Update: 12/2017

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Awoken by the sound of street life outside the window of the hotel room I am sharing with another student. It would be another night of jet lag with me up at four in the morning checking my emails. Jet lag is a real deal. Breakfast was a normal fare of fruit, coffee, fried potatoes, rice, and some meat thing I yet to figure out. It seems the hotel thinks Americans must have meat at every meal every day when the opposite is true. The day ahead for me was going to be a jam-packed day into the bush with the Maasai and going to a school where the Maasai children attend to see Convoy of Hope’s child feeding program in action.

After breakfast, I loaded up into a safari jeep and endured a bumpy ride through the bush of Tanzania on red iron rich clay roads. My roommate and I found ourselves in the same jeep with four other students from our sister school Evangel University in Springfield Missouri who were all on the football team. Four football players and two little women all crammed into a safari jeep were a sight to see!

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Clich’e to say this, but I do believe I left my heart in Tanzania Africa, namely the Maasai children of Tinga (small village near the base of Mt. Longido). I cannot believe how energetic these children are when they have visitors. Hard to keep up with them at times. As soon as they were let out of their classes, they latched on to all of us and at times never let go unless forced. Some even fought over my arms and were very interested in my skin color, counting my fingers, my clothing, my hair, my backpack, and my phone which took pictures of them. Most never had seen another human look like the way some of my team members looked. The team tried to teach them a new game called four corners which turned out to chaotic.  I was one of the four corners which at one point had large waves if kids come running at me, nearly knocking me over in the process! A few of the children figured out the poking game and proceeded to poke me rather hard in the gut. It turned into all out war at one point with other team members getting poked as well. The iPhone became one tool in getting me to do crazy things for the camera. Even one of the professor’s sunglasses became popular for the children to try on.

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The main purpose of the trip to the school was to help with Convoy of Hope’s children’s feeding program setup at this school. All the students here have greatly benefited from the feeding program as well as their families. Before Convoy came, most of the student only received one meal a day. Most were in poor health due to lack of nutrients missing from their diet, having intestinal worms, and having unclean water to drink.

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Since Convoy of Hope’s program, the children have access to clean water to drink for them and their families. They now get nutritious meals at school and at home. Each of the team members had a turn at handing out the mango juice we brought for them (they have never had anything like juice before, it is very rare!), passed out the plates for the food, and ladled out fortified porridge with key nutrients along with de-worming medication for them to have. From pictures I have seen, they all look much more healthy than they did before. Also, they have greens growing in a school garden plot for other nutrients into their diet.

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The Tanzanian government has made it mandatory for all school children to have access to school and no school can turn a child away at the primary level (elementary level). This means there are more children then there is room for in the classroom, and so when we drove up to the school, some of the children were at desks outside under trees with their lessons. Just imagine children in the US having to sit outside in the elements to get an education because there is no room for them in the classroom. It would not happen, but it is a reality for most students in Tanzania. Also, Tanzania has a real shortage of certified teachers to teach students. This school in particular only has three teachers teaching up to sixty students across multiple class ages and a headmaster who has to teach as well to give every child an education. Right now there is a foundation built for a third building, but the funds to finish it are non-existence. I hope in the near future this building will be completed and all children can learn in a proper classroom.

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School building
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School building

The day was hot and dusty around the area. I even got a bad sunburn with sunblock on because of how close to the equator Tanzania is, and the fact anti-malarial drugs can cause the skin to be sensitive to sunlight. It was worth it to expereince this wonderful day with the children! Even if it means down the road I will get skin cancer (I hope not).

Previous Post:  On The Streets of Arusha W/ Convoy of Hope
Next Post:  The Maasai Women & Community

More Information:
Convoy of Hope Tanzania
Cheeky Monkey Safari Tours

Disclaimer: All links are for reference and are in no way affiliate links. I do not receive or am paid for promotion on products mentioned in this post.

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Tanzanian Adventures|On The Streets of Arusha W/ Convoy of Hope

Updated 12/2018

My first morning in Tanzania started with waking up to a dog fight outside the hotel window at five in the morning. I would soon find out this would be a common morning occurrence for the duration of my stay. The morning started off with me looking out the window at the street and seeing people walking along the street on their morning routine. School children in their uniforms walking to school, adults on their way to work, and stores opening up for the daily business giving this traveler a glimpse into the daily life of Arusha.

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View from the hotel room window (Old Moshi Rd)

This pink building hides the reality of poverty intermingling near fancy hotels in this part of town. A reminder of why I am here with Northwest University and meeting with Convoy of Hope on the same day. Breakfast was at the hotel’s restaurant most days which consists of fried potatoes, Tanzanian pilau rice, Kenyan sausages, banana pancakes, East African donuts called magwinya, fresh fruit and coffee made from beans in the Kilimanjaro region coffee plantations. After finishing, I grabbed a 1.5L bottle water and headed to the conference room to meet the team from Convoy of Hope.

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Eating our first breakfast in Tanzania (I’m in the purple). Credit: Ingrid Navarro

The day’s agenda was to hit the ground running with Convoy of Hope and start working with them on some of their projects they are doing in the local communities around the area.

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Headquarters of Convoy of Hope Tanzania. Credit: Natalie Douglass

The main focus for Convoy of Hope in Tanzania is sustainability for communities around the area. The work done by this team was mostly done in agricultural/ small garden training, women’s empowerment, child feeding programs for nutrition, clean water, and crises relief. I did not realize how small the organization Convoy of Hope is compared to other humanitarian organizations like Samaritan’s Purse. Convoy of Hope concentrate its focus on a few areas and this makes them effective in their work. Even without medical component to their work, I can see great things they do for the health of those in the Arusha area and all of Africa. We all asked questions to get a better idea of the problems faced in the work being done, and learning what would be an effective way of asking questions to help better understand the needs of the community to better help them with issues being faced. After two hours of discussion we were all invited to have some tea (a custom holdover from the colonial days when a British colony). The tea is nothing like any I have ever tasted before! Marsala tea is a new type of tea to me, and it packs a powerful punch too without the caffeine! It has a spicy ginger taste that hits the back of the throat from the cardamom and cinnamon mixed with the black tea leaves. I ended up finding some at a local supermarket to take back with me and later found some at a local Indian grocery store back home.

We all mingled around the demonstration gardens looking at all the cool ways of using planters to grow crops in. Found a banana tree with bananas growing on it, and meeting some of the women who are a part of the women’s empowerment program in a gathering.

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Bananas growing
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Demonstration garden
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Demonstration Garden
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Women gathering for microloan meeting

Lunch was at a local restaurant off the main road called Milestone Club in Arusha. The restaurant is one of few places we are able to eat at without getting sick and the manager is good friends with Convoy of Hope. The atmosphere was open to the elements, with a thatch roof overhead, and an interesting playlist of music ( on this day it was Celine Dion’s greatest hits playing). Here I tried Tanzania’s national dish ugali which is a cornmeal porridge served with grilled meat which was whole chicken (biriyani and mchicha) for me. Others had the beef, fish, beans as the main dish with their ugali. The fish one even had eyes still in the socket and a few daring people actually ate them whole which made for a disgusting sight to witness! BBQ goat was passed down the table for all of us to try. The BBQ goat had a cross between the taste of lamb and the texture of steak when you eat it. The goat tasted better than I expected, and I am surely going to try it again in the future.

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Pork is not seen much around Arusha, and the local butcher at any of the markets did not have pork product for sale. I wonder why? Is it an unclean animal in Tanzanian culture? Since water has been from the bottle source, I decided to try a new drink, Stoney’s. Stoney’s is a ginger beer drink produced by Coke Cola and is non-alcoholic. The ginger-ness is much more powerful than the ginger beers we have in the Seattle area. Sadly the drink is not sold in the US market.

After lunch, we all were split into groups to interact with the locals at the marketplace in Mianzini area of Arusha. The first encounter was a woman who just started her little shop in the middle of her neighborhood to sell staples of food items and necessities. She was very happy about how Convoy of Hope helped her start her shop and now she can afford to send her children to school by the income she generates through this little shop. I bought from her some chocolate cookies she had, and I pray her store will prosper into a sustainable business. The second encounter was a woman who has a shop along the main streets of the area who sold a variety of items. Her hard work, dedication to raising her son, never-ending faith in God’s provision, and hoping one day send her son to college is an inspiration for all of us to strive to better ourselves through hard work. At one point there was a fight in the street where a young man on his motorbike had a bloody face and other men were trying to force him off his bike. We did not stick around to know what happened, but there was a drunk man who did follow our group yelling at us in Swahili. Crazy moment!

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Market of Mainzini
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Streets of Mainzini area of Arusha
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Mainzini Market street
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Arusha, Tanzania
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Mainzini area of Arusha

As I walked through the streets of Mainzini it became apparent how different poverty looks from the pictures seen. Instead of shakes stacked on top of each other, the houses are spread out with small plots of land with crops growing. People are generally happy and kind to each other as they go about their daily business. The house might be made of whatever materials could be found, and the heat sources are wood gathered along the roads. Small shops everywhere sell everything possible, and someone always willing to help you find something. Chickens, cows, donkeys, goats and children run all over the place and everything needed to live is within walking distance of the front door. All mixed with pure determination, something most Americans do not see. All the people we visited did not want a free handout, and they are very thankful for the support they received from Convoy of Hope in helping the get out of poverty.

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Streets of Arusha
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Mainzini suburbs of Arusha

After a stop at the hotel for a quick refresh, we all headed downtown Arusha to eat street food at Khan’s BBQ. We all ate BBQ chicken, Nan bread and some beef kabob on a street corner in the middle of a bustling evening in the city.

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The chicken was not as spicy as I thought it would be, and the Nan bread was sooo yummy! I have not had any Nan bread as good in my life!

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Sitting in the evening light in good conversation with the sound of Muslim call to prayer echoing through the streets. Something is not heard in the US very often and it has an eerie sound to it. Street dogs begging close by for scraps of food, and having rocks thrown at them to keep them away. Eating street food in Africa without getting sick was a relief. It seemed normal sitting in the street lights in the middle of Arusha and having a sense of magic in the air that only happens once in a lifetime.

Previous Post: Beginning of An Adventure

Next Post: Love From The Maasai Children & Feeding Program

More Information:

Convoy of Hope

Milestone Club Arusha

Khan’s BBQ Arusha

National Dish of Tanzania-ugali

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Disclaimer: All links are for reference and are in no way affiliate links. I do not receive or am paid for promotion on products mentioned in this post.

Tanzanian Adventures|Beginning of An Adventure

Updated 12/2017

Traveling to Tanzania is no small task. It took months (six months to be exact) to get ready for this one week adventure all the way across the world. In those months I  read about the area, Arusha, in which I was to visit, gather all the supplies needed for this adventure, and visit a travel medicine doctor to make sure I don’t come home with any disease prevalent in East Africa.

After all, this was a once in a lifetime opportunity to visit a part of the world few people have the chance to see.

The African adventure began at 7:00pm PST at SeaTac Airport for a red-eye flight to 10:15pm to Dulls International Airport on a Sunday evening. The ride to the airport was uneventful for a Seattle evening, and got to airport in record time.

But things were not going to be uneventful for long……

Seattle Washington to Washington DC: Worse Start To A Trip
I feel TSA hates me at SeaTac airport. No other airport TSA has ever made me feel horrible as the TSA agents at SeaTac. Seriously they hate me. One minute everything is going just great and next I’m having a full body pat down all over my cell phone! Thank goodness the guy (yes it was a male who did this pat down!!!) decided not to explore certain places I should not mention.

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After finding nothing I was let go to board my flight.

But it still gets better! Getting told by United Airline’s gatekeeper “I’m in timeout” because there was a backup on boarding the flight. After awhile it got old when he went further in saying “don’t mess with me.” He was joking I hope because of a 10:15 pm,  I really had not brain complicity to comprehend if he was. I joke about it, but in a way, it bothered me for some odd reason (at the time United was in deep water over an incident involving a passenger being dragged off an over booked flight two weeks before!). Eventually I boarded the flight only to find out how worse it would get from there.

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To make matters even worst, economy class is horrible with all of us in our group crammed like sardines in the back of the plane near the toilets. The turbulence was horrible for a red-eye flight, jolting anyone out from a little nap. At one point I did become sick enough to not know if it was low blood sugar, low blood pressure, motion sickness or the stifling heat from all the bodies crammed in a metal tube. After eating a whole Pro Meal Bar and drinking some water, I began to feel a little better and no longer felt like I was going to pass out. I will not be flying United Airlines’ red-eye anytime soon after this experience. No one on the plane got any sleep except the guy in the same row as me by the window who snored all the way from Seattle to Virginia. He must have been a frequent flier to have that talent.

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When we all arrived in Virginia (Washington Dulles International Airport) no one got any sleep, all of us were at Starbucks as real true Seattleites fashion and hoping the next flight would produce some sleep on the way to Ethiopia. The layover was five hours long of staring out the terminal windows at a beautiful sunny day in Virginia (and warm too apparently) with flatness for miles.  Trying not to be perplexed by the souvenirs being sold with the word “Washingtonian” which is weird since this is what people in Washington State are called, and getting a few winks of sleep in the airport terminal floor.

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Washington DC to Ethiopia:
Thirteen hours of flying across the world at this point and you wonder how is this possible to be going forward instead of going backward? The flight was uneventful (unlike the red-eye) and I slept through most of the thirteen hours to combat the jet lag enough to function for the next few traveling hours to Tanzania. On the plane’s flight progress screen, the flight took us over Spain, Portugal, Egypt, part of Morocco, and Sudan. All those countries below ready to be explored in the near future. On the flight, I was in a row with a woman who was traveling back home to Ethiopia from the states, and she informed me it was winter time in Ethiopia. No snow on the ground except in the higher peaks (the plane flew over some white peaks, mountains?) and it looked mostly arid desert. Snow is unheard of in these parts of Africa, or so I thought. The airport Addis Ababa is at the foot of Mount Entoto and near the city of Addis Ababa. The airport is an open, sparse hub for Ethiopian Airlines.

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Ethiopia through a window at the airport
As soon as I stepped into the terminal,  the humidity and heat hit me. Reminded me a little like stepping off the plane in Honolulu Hawaii.  It was here I first encountered a semi-squat toilet and learned toilet paper is not flushable in this country, but instead has to be put into a little trash bin by the toilet after use.

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Waiting for flight to Tanzania

After waiting four hours for our group’s flight to Tanzania in the airport terminal, we boarded the flight, and I can say I have stepped on Ethiopian soil while walking across the tarmac to the waiting plane. I was very much glad to have a whole row to myself which meant I could look out the window when the plane arrived in Tanzania.

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Ethiopia to Tanzania:

The flight was interesting because it was four hours and they fed us all lunch. Surprise!  Once the plane touched down at Kilimanjaro International Airport, it was one of those scenes out of the Ladies Detective Series where there is a huge commercial plane next to a small town airport in the middle of nowhere Africa. As soon as I stepped off the plane the humid heat hit you full on. And being at the end point of travel all my traveling companions agreed we stunk of body odor and need to shower so bad!

Getting a travel visitor visa took a while to complete especially in the humid heat with no cool air to relieve. Most of us girls had rosy red cheeks from heat by the time we all reached to window to hand over our passport, visa application, and our $100 USD (must be a  $100 bill, not five $20 bills, or pay in Euros or higher weighted currency, and not Tanzanian shillings)  to the immigration officer. Then after approval, get the real visa stamped into the passport at the visa verification line before picking up our luggage. It’s a process, a long one when there is a huge plane full of people, and I think next time I will apply for the visa prior to leaving the US. After all of us successfully got through visa line, we all boarded a bus to head to our hotel in Arusha.

Green Mountain Hotel, Arusha Tanzania:
Our drive to Arusha from the airport took little over an hour passing what is considered in America as slums where garbage dump is next to a muddy river bank, people rummaging around in it, dogs roaming around, people walking along the road carrying large bundles of stuff home, fields of maize or corn, and crazy driving like never seen in the USA. This is what would be called poverty with muddy dirt roads leading off the paved roads into muddy red dirt roads with shacks crammed together. It is very different from what you see in the America. 18527134_1432305933492979_1565339276343154580_o - Copy

Our group checked into a small hotel in the middle a busy neighborhood outside Arusha proper. Green Mountain Hotel is where we all staying for five of the nights we were in Tanzania (other was a Lutheran hotel at the end of our trip). Once checked in I crashed for three hours before dinner from all the jet-lag with a much-needed nap. Which did not help later when it was time to actually go to bed. Dinner was a gathering of all of us eating family style, and meeting four new members of our team. After dinner it was off to figure out how to use the shower and then crash again for bed.

Green Mountain Hotel from the road.

More Information:
Flights: United Airlines (Seattle to Washington DC) & Ethiopian Airlines (Washington DC to Tanzania)
Hotel: Green Mountain Hotel

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Disclaimer: All links are for reference and are in no way affiliate links. I do not receive or am paid for promotion on products mentioned in this post.

Packing Guide|Things Needed For Tanzania & East Africa

When it comes to packing, I am an over packer. I do believe carrying too much weighs you down (not a fan of large handbags) and makes everything expensive when traveling. In my opinion, packing less and only the essentials in Africa is better for you and for the locals.

On a trip to Tanzania, I stuffed a few t-shirts, pairs of khaki pants, socks, swimsuit, a sweatshirt, a light wind breaker jacket, flip-flops, hiking boots, and undergarments for a total of two weeks. But along with the basic clothing, I had a few items worth taking with you (besides the smart phone) on a trip to East Africa.

Purified Water Bottle

Drinking the tap water in Africa is very risky which leads many tourists and residents to buy bottle water. A big chunk of your budget could go to buying a 1-2 liter plastic bottle of water a day that will contribute to the already plastic contamination prevalent in Africa.

This is where my trusty backpacking  water bottle LifeStraw Go Water Filter Bottle comes in handy. It removes bacteria, parasites, organic chemical matter, heavy metals and viruses out of the water. This saved me a ton of money, and I knew if I ran out of water, I could easily refill without worrying about getting sick.

Organic Bags

There are countries within the East African region that have a law against plastic bags. This means Ziplock bags will be confiscated or you will get hefty fine if caught with a plastic bag within the country. Plus it is a great way of reducing unnecessary waste destroying the natural beauty of Africa.

rezip 5-piece Stand-Up Leakproof Reusable Storage Bag Pack n' Go Kit

I mostly bring Ziplock bags when I travel to keep toiletries from spilling all over my stuff, but in Africa, I need to find an alternative to the plastic baggies. Re-Zip Seal Reusable Storage Bag Kit helped to keep food, toiletries and other smaller items organized through out the trip.

Money Belt

Rick Steve’s has been talking about this little belt pouch since he started doing European tours and if worn correctly, pick pockets will not be able to get the valuables from you. His advice comes in handy not only in Europe, but also around the world-especially in Africa. Most money belts comes with RFID blocking features to keep credit cards, room key card and your passport information safe.

Money Belt - RFID Blocking Travel Wallet For Passport, Money, Credit Cards, Documents, and Phone - Black or Tan

The money belt I used in Tanzania is the money belt by Travel Navigator. It never showed under cloths and not once did I have someone try to pick pocket me while wearing it.

A Day Bag

During a day trip I would go with a day bag in a form of a day hiking pack. It comes in handy with holding all the essentials like sunglasses, sunscreen, bug spray, extra clothing and any small items needed for the day.

Microfiber Towel

Do yourself a favor and get one. When in Africa you do not have time for a wet towel to dry, let alone do you want to haul around a smelly one! I bought this towel a few years ago, and has doubled as an airline blanket on long haul flights.

Travel Adapter

Tanzania and most of East Africa (Except Rwanda) are on a type G sockets (Rwanda type C). The last thing you want to do is arrive in the country without a way to charge your phone or any other electronic device.Be on the safe side and bring a universal adapter.

Travel Adapter Uppel Dual USB All-in-one Worldwide Travel Chargers Adapters for US EU UK AU about 152 countries Wall Universal Power Plug Adapter Charger with Dual USB and Safety Fuse (Blue)

Uppel Dual USB All in one Worldwide Travel Charger Adapter not only worked in Africa, but 152 different countries, so you are covered when you decide to travel to other places. This small compact adapter even kept the electronic devices plugged in from unexpected power surge and outages known to happen in parts of Africa.

Sunblock and Sunglasses

Sunblock is not used a lot by Africans and it is hard to find once you arrive unless in touristy areas which they will cost a lot. I recommend you bring a bottle with you in check luggage. I recommend at least 50 SPF or higher and you will be applying it more frequently, so you may want two bottle.

It is amazing how much brighter the sun is when you are close to the equator. Do your eyes a favor and bring some or get your existing glasses Transitions treatment. Reflection of the sun’s rays during the day on objects can really hurt the eyes.

Deodorant

The cost of deodorant in Africa is sky-high, and as one blogger said “dodgy as hell.” Unless you like having your pits feeling they are on fire, I would bring some deodorant with you.

(Women) Female Urination Device

GoGirl Female Urination Device, Lavender

Not only do you face the possibilities of squat toilets, but you may not find a decent place to do your business. This is why Go Girl Female Urination Device is a life saver both traveling and backpacking. If you are a women who cannot stand the thought of squatting over a hole in the ground, this is for you. Make sure to pack a roll of toilet paper with you! Toilet paper is not always available!

Headlamp or Light Weight Flashlight

Like I have said earlier, Africa suffers from continuous power outages in many countries. These are often controlled by the government and there isn’t much we can do unless you plan to stay in pricey hotels and lodges that have their own power supplies. Aside from that, spending a lot of time in the wild of Africa safari is huge. A headlamp or a flashlight is essential for your safety and for your ability to warn others of your presences.

 

I hope you found this list useful! If there is anything missing from the list you find essential let me know in the comments!

 

 

Disclaimer:
All products mentioned and linked were bought by me with my own money. I do not get a commission from Amazon when you click the links in the post. I have provided the links and descriptions as a reference to items I found useful on my travels in Africa. Also I am not affiliated with any of the brands mentioned in this post. 

 

 

Why Tanzania?

The question most asked when I tell people Tanzania is where Northwest University is being called to serve in community development. The thing is most have heard of this country from stories of daring climbers who summit Mt. Kilimanjaro and the old world charm of going on a safari and Disney’s Lion King to name of few. But beyond these thrill adventures is a world very few even touch. The porter who lugged your suitcase to your room, the tour guide driving the vehicle on safari, go home to a very different world beyond the luxury we as travelers enjoy. After all, this is Africa, and even in East Africa, there is still poverty starring the traveler straight in the eye.

Beyond the wall of a luxury resort is a reality seen by few who look closely. Even though Tanzania is relatively a safe country, there is still citizens who live below the poverty level of a $1 a day, and unrest still in present in some parts of the country. You can say it all stems from unrest, wars, colonial period (German and British) and refugees coming from other African countries. All are true, and all are a part of the fabric of what makes the Tanzanian people such a vibrant group of people.

This vibrant group of people is the reason why I went to Tanzania. A once in a lifetime opportunity to see the world from a different perspective, and to find what I have been told is Ubantu, “the belief we are defined by our compassion and kindness towards others.” Something I found to be the heart and soul of the people of Tanzania and Africa.

In the following posts is a recount of my journey in the heart of Tanzania, and the ubantu of Africa.

African Proverb: