The Island Life| Whidbey Island

For six weeks I called Whidbey Island home and became familiar with the slower way of life on the island. Here I was a part of the community on the island and found I really like this place.

Ebbey’s Landing National Historical Reserve:

The past meets present in a working rural landscape and community. This is what the National Parks Service says about this place, and it is where I became very familiar with for five weeks. In 1978 it was created as a 17,572-acre reserve integrates historic farms, a seaside town (Coupeville) native and pioneer land use traditions and ecologically significant areas.

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Here I got my first lesson in sustainable agriculture and a history lesson in why mega-mansions are bad business for land so rich with productive soil. Also spending a good part of my time on the campus of Pacific Rim Institute of Environmental Sciences is located in the heart of this reserve as part of Ebey’s Prairie.

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Coupeville:

The town has a small town historical charm with an agricultural community that is thriving with all the ties to the historical significance of Ebey’s Landing Reserve. It is the second oldest towns in Washington State with buildings dating from the 1850s and 1870s.

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First time I was introduced to Coupeville was to attend a root beer float party at the Compass Rose B&B. The house was an old Victorian-era home that when I took a tour, it was walking through an antique store or a museum. Everything inside was original to the era. I kept thinking how amazing this would be to live here! The kitchen had the largest collection of copper pans and utensils I had ever seen! Imagine cleaning all those!

The second time I had to go down to the famous wharf everyone talks about. This wharf was built in 1905 and the weathered boards could tell tales of a time long ago when it was the main transportation stop in the turn of the century.

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With a group of friends and headed for the shops. The main street had cute little shops to explore. I was disappointed with Kingfisher Books and the antique shop were closed. I really wanted to go inside. Ice cream soothed my disappointment really fast!

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Check out:
The Salty Mug-Coffee, pastries, soups and chowders. Inexpensive.
Coupe’s Last Stand– Need a hot dog, polish, brats, and veggie dogs with all the fixings.
Lavender Wind-the shop with items made from the lavender grown on the farm

Oak Harbor:

Cue Top Gun, Highway to the Danger Zone! 
As I have said before, the military seems to find me or is it the other way around? Sleeping in the old officers’ barracks at Camp Casey, you would expect some military activity to happen. For a total of two weeks worth of days, Whidbey Island Naval Station would do practice flying maneuvers over the area. I should be used to this by now with commercial air traffic flying over at all hours of the day in Seattle, but these jets are much more sonic loud then a Boeing bird. I can see why residents on the island complain about the noise. Yet it is part of living within an area with active military bases. I will never forget when one flew a little to close to the ground for comfort when touring Kettle’s Edge Farm. Coming close to one of those military birds is scary when you think of it. You think it may crash! Over the five weeks I started to tune them out, and by the last night at Camp Casey, I could sleep through the noise.

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Camp Casey Conference Center:

Camp Casey Conference Center was once a part of Fort Casey where the enlisted and officer barracks are located. There are a few beautiful historical officer houses build in the style known as “military Victorian” that can be rented for the weekend at either Fort Casey Inn or directly from Seattle Pacific University which owns the property next to Fort Casey State Park.

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The floor I was on

For Au Sable, the five weeks were spent living in the BOQ building between Captain’s house and another officers house near the beach. The rooms assigned had two navy issued beds with a mattress and chest of drawers. Military style! Some of the rooms had bunks where four people were assigned. I was lucky not to have three other people crammed into a room!

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Deception Pass:

Took a small hiking adventure up to Goose Rock in the Deception State Park. This 0.5-mile hike to a vista with breathtaking views of the Pacific Sound and Northern Whidbey Island.

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From atop of the summit you can see the San Juan Islands, Cranberry Lake and NAS Whidbey. IMG_3275

The island in the background is up for sale! If you have a cool 5.6 million dollars laying around it can be yours!IMG_3278

I have been over this bridge about a dozen times and the view never gets old. The summer heat and the sunny weather made it even more enchanting for some of the people in the group who are not from Washington.

After spending six weeks on Whidbey, it was hard to leave back to Seattle. I will be coming back in the future, and who knows, may move here.

If once you have slept on an island
You’ll never be quite the same;
You may look as you looked the day before
And go by the same old name,
You may bustle about in street and shop
You may sit at home and sew,
But you’ll see blue water and wheeling gulls
Wherever your feet may go.
You may chat with the neighbors of this and that
And close to your fire keep,
But you’ll hear ship whistle and lighthouse bell
And tides beat through your sleep.
Oh! you won’t know why and you can’t say how
Such a change upon you came,
But once you have slept on an island,
You’ll never be quite the same.

Peaks Are Alive|Olympic National Park

I find myself in beautiful places and with that, I find myself at places I least expect. Every time I think of the Olympic Mountains I think of the Sound of Music. Wide open alpine meadows with peaks looking straight out of Alps. Why did Leavenworth have to be in the Cascades? Three days spent in what I believe the most beautiful natural park in Washington, a beautiful place everyone should visit.

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Hurricane Hill Trail:

In order to find the trailhead, you have to drive past the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center along a narrow road with one nerve-wracking switch back with a cliff. No tour buses here!

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The trailhead at the time could only be accessed by the lower trail parking lot. Along the first mile of the trail, the Olympic Peaks peeked out between trees. The vistas were spectacular with so much beauty coming all at once. While hiking to the top, our group came across so many deer walking around as if people did not bother them. One even came popping out of the bushes while a group of us were trying to figure out of we saw a bear in the distant slope.

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Marmots were also out lazy sunbathing on rocks like vacationers. Clouds coming across the slopes like wisps of smoke and a spooky show at the same time. The quietness of the landscape was so beautiful and unreal when this high up.

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Lunch was on a rock outcrop I ended up climbing up later to survey all the surrounding area. While climbing up the rock pile, clouds whipping all around me to the point where it was a wall of clouds. The song Into The Mist by Eivør going through my head as the clouds surrounded me.

Walking in the mist
No one knows where I’ve been
Far from my home now
Going in circles round and round
I’m on my own now

Something’s hiding in the dark
Lurking in between the rocks
Whispers in my ear
I turn around but no one’s there
I call up but there’s no answer

Shadow, shadow by my side
Drifting through the misty night
Are you wandering just like me
Within this surreality?

At this point I was separated from the group….and…I had a feeling something was not right. To be alone and exposed to predication (cougar sightings in the area along with bear), it was unnerving to see a deer below take off running into the trees with deadly quietness following. I knew something was close by, and I needed to figure out where it could be coming through. Thank goodness the group showed up with laughter and not coming face to face with a predator.

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Later a group of hikers had seen a black bear on the trail close by! I was lucky! The rest of the hike was uneventful and mostly viewing all the plants and other animals around the trail. The ride back to camp was rocking out to Mumford and Sons “I Will Wait For You” with a smile on my face.

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Obstruction Point Trail:

There is a dirt road turn out before the parking lot at Hurricane Ridge that goes down to this backcountry trail. Many people don’t see it, and this is one of the best-kept secrets of this area of the National Park. The road is long dusty with lots of switchbacks as it winds towards a small parking lot with a pit toilet. So bring your own toilet paper!

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Sunsets are starting to become a thing lately, and I am not complaining about it. Rewarding after a long day of hiking to summit a peak to watch the sun sink down ending another day.

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Spending time atop of a mountain viewing the sunset listening to the wind whip around you in near silence is as close to God as it gets. 37778120_10212406487747798_356720724972404736_o

When night fell, and it was time to put the headlamp on, we trekked down the mountain trying to keep on the trail that was nonexistent in the dark towards the van. Out here the stars shine brightly, and yet a shooting star decides to give us a show. On this night laying in a field with others viewing the stars in the sky made the world seem so small. _DSC0197

Five am wake up call again to chase the sunrise. Again we trekked towards another lake to view the coming sunrise. Pumpkin Seed Lake is an alpine lake very few people know about. It is somewhere off the beaten path of Obstruction Point Trail and finding it can be challenging. Challenging since the trail to it is not marked. You may have to ask someone who knows.

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This frog did not have a great morning after being caught two times by people. By the second time he just sat there defeated. 39400036_10212577663787092_875643024476995584_o

With enough coffee coursing through my veins, I headed up towards other alpine lakes in the area. These nondescript lakes are nestled between other peaks and off known trails where climbing talus and boulder fields is a must.

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This alpine lake at the bottom of the ravine was not as cold as the one at Heather Lake. Just getting down to it was interesting with the possible slide completely down into the lake if you lost your footing. DSCN4477

The famous Ptaragen made one last apearence before it flown away. Many people do not believe they exist because they are hard to spot, live in the highest coldest parts of the mountain ranges. Hear them is at times the only clue they are in the area, and they do get stepped on because they look just like the surrondings.

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Hurricane Ridge Trail:

After partying with another group at the campsite, we all headed towards Hurricane Ridge to hike the small Hurricane Ridge Trail.

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So I said in a previous post I had fed wildlife. Well, I did it again! Yep, this time it was a bunch of gray jays that are also known as camp robbers. To hold a bird in your had is a Disney princess moment. They loved crumbled granola bars and would take a sandwich if I let them. I know shame on me again! I will not be doing this again-it is out of my system now.

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Ok moving on…

Three days hiking in the Olympics was and will be a breathtaking experience. The peak was alive just as in the Sound of Music.

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Information:
Obstruction Point Trail
Hurricane Hill
Hurricane Ridge

Heather Lake Trail| Hike Into The Alpine

 

Alpine lakes stir up images of crystal pristine water with emerald green vegetation, with possible snow on the high slopes. Heather Lake Trail is one to do in late spring early summer to view this beautiful alpine wonder without having to backpack very far up a mountain. This lake has been on my list for some time, and when I had the opportunity to hike to this lake as my first alpine hiking trip, I could not pass it up.

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With a pack all loaded with all the essentials, I headed out for a 4.6 miles round trip to the lake summit. The trail winds through young growth and old growth forests with lots of green vegetation along the path. There were sections where old boardwalks and bridges have been beaten up by nature.

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IMG_3182 Along the trail, there were small streams running over rocks with small pools of water where salamanders were hiding. A fellow hiker in my group caught a salamander hiding under a rock in the above picture. The little guy was not a happy camper about it, and at one point almost slipped out of her hand entirely.

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At one point a banana slug was found to be moving slowly up a trunk of a moss-covered tree. This one decided it did not want to be down on the trail and decided to move to a higher location.

_DSC0041If you are wondering, yes I have licked a banana slug before, and the slime from the slug does make the tongue go numb for a short while (I do not endorse licking slugs in general!). One time was enough for me and thus would never do it again.

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Once to the top of the lake shore, my fellow hikers and I found a nice vantage point on a rock overlooking the lake for lunch. This rock has been known to be proposal rock and a few people have been asked here in the past.

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After much needed substance, the snow pack near the slope by the lake was a call to be explored. The whole time I was looking for watermelon snow (snow that is a ting pinkish-red) for a sample to analyze in the lab later. Watermelon snow does taste a little like watermelon, but you do not want to consume it for you will get a bad case of Hersey squats!

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While there appears to be one lake, Heather Lake is actually made up of one large lake and a smaller one more like a marsh. Here plants and small animals thrive to create a mini ecosystem in an alpine elevation.

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While exploring the smaller lake area, I came across some frog eggs. At first I though they maybe salamander eggs, but frog eggs have a distinct color and shape to them. They almost look like a bunch of eyes looking at you in my hand.

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With the summer heatwave in full effect, the 80°F temperature made this one heck of a sweaty hike. At one point I decided to dip my feet into the lake to cool off. Just imagine how refreshing it was for thirty seconds before you cannot feel your foot! Heather Lake is an alpine lake being fed by glaciers, thus making this lake very cold!!

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After spending some time by the lake soaking in the quiet beauty and being one with nature, I headed down towards civilization. Even with a dip in the alpine lake, the hike down was still sweaty from the 80°F heat the area was getting at the time. By the time I reached the parking lot, I was clear out of the water! A ranger station a few miles down the road had a water spigot to refill my water bottle for the drive home. A reminder to carry enough water with you, even if it is two water bottles full of water.

Have you hiked Heather Lake before? Did you do it in spring or summer? Or in fall or winter?

Information:
Heather Lake Trail